Tag: strategy

Communication Vocab: Words You Need to Know

Communication Vocab: Words You Need to Know

Photo by Diomari Madulara on Unsplash

The next time you are involved in communication or strategic planning, these are a few key definitions to keep in mind.

Strategy – What

What are you going to do? Your strategy is the words you put down on paper to overview the plan you have created. 

Tactics – How

How are you going to accomplish _____ ? This is the set of activities that you and your team will do in order to accomplish the strategy. 

Audience – Who

Who are you trying to reach? This is the people group that will be the focus of your tactics. 

Goals – The win

What does a “win” look like?  These are generally expressed in numbers; although, that can vary in a church setting. For example, we want to see __ % growth in our groups ministry by next year. 

How to Start in Social Media

Social media is not a fad or a trend. It has radically changed how people communicate on a day-to-day basis.  But still, there are churches that remain unsure about how to make the leap into social media. It can seem overwhelming, so here are a few tips to get started in social media.

1. Pick a platform.

You don’t need to be on every social media platform right off the bat. Look at the make up of your church. What social media do they use most? Is it college students? Try Twitter or Instagram. Mostly young family’s? Try Facebook. For most churches, I’d recommend starting with Facebook.

2. Set a strategy.

Who do you want to reach? What will you post? How will you manage your social media presence? Outline a strategy before you start. It’ll provide clarity for you and your team. And, if you have leadership who doesn’t see the value of social media, a well-defined strategy will provide you with answers to their questions about why your church needs to engage in this space.

3. Curate some content.

Your church is bursting with content. Post photos from events along with links to register. What’s the message for Sunday’s sermon? Post verses that will prepare the hearts of your audience. What’s the worship team singing this week? Post a video with a new worship song or a behind-the-scenes photo of practice. Ask questions about what people took away from the sermon series. And, include images when you can.

4. Start a schedule.

There are many free tools available to help you post on a consistent schedule.  The two best tools I’ve seen are Hootsuite and Buffer. These have free and paid options. If you’re just starting, try to post at least once a day. Develop a rhythm where your audience can expect to hear from you. Find a volunteer or staff member who can manage this schedule and commit to interacting with people on a weekly basis.

Remember, social media should be two-way communication. It’s more about conversation than publication.

What do you think? What are other tips for churches starting in social media? 

Aim Small, Miss Small

Remember the scene in “The Patriot” when Mel Gibson instructs his son how to shoot and says, “aim small, miss small”? He also tells him to keep both eyes open.  It struck me that this principle can be applied to church communications.

A smaller aim increases the likelihood of hitting your target. And keeping both eyes open helps you see your target twice as well. 

For example, if I’m promoting a women’s bible study it doesn’t make sense to do a Sunday announcement video because the Sunday morning audience is not a small target. Rather, I’ll instruct the women’s ministry leaders to share it through their social media accounts, personal conversations and in the women’s ministry Facebook group.

Too often, church communications blasts the entire crowd with a single shot through the Sunday bulletin or an announcement in hopes that it will land on the appropriate target. Take the time to scope out, with both eyes, and decide which communication piece will have the most impact on your intended audience.

So keep both eyes open and aim small. You’ll be less likely to miss.