Tag: church communication

How to Create an Inexpensive Booklet

How to Create an Inexpensive Booklet

Print pieces can get expensive fast. Most churches, mine included, don’t have a massive communication budget to spend on print pieces. And booklets are one of the most expensive print pieces because of the multiple pages. I’ve found we can ease this cost by printing a cover out-of-house and finish the inner pages in-house. This gives a finished look but costs significantly less.  This doesn’t work for every booklet application, but it’s especially useful for pieces like devotionals, reading plans, prayer guides and small group guides.

Here’s how to do it: 

1. Design a full-bleed 8.5×11 cover page.
(That’s where the color extends all the way to the edge of the page.) I’ll usually ask our design volunteer do this. This will fold to a standard 5.5×8.5 booklet.

2. Order the cover from an online or local print vendor. 
I like to use Overnight Prints or NextDay Flyers. I select the full-page flier option and have it printed one-sided. Usually, I’ll pick a heavier cover stock option, like the 100#.  (To give you an estimate of cost savings, 1,000 full-page fliers only costs about $200.  1,000 12-page booklets would cost about $1,000.)

3. Set it up as your cover page and then print the inside. 
Configure your print settings to a booklet with a cover page and finish with bi-fold, staple-binding. Keep in mind: To do this, you need an office printer that can run a heavier stock without jamming (because jams are the worst) and can do a staple-binding.

And voila! You’ll have a pretty print piece without busting the budget.

Here’s an example from our small groups expo.

booklet-cover-example
Cover
booklet-inside
Inside

If you liked this post, here are a few more you might like.

How to Create Bulletins In-House

How to Create Video Announcements

4 Things to Communicate to First Time Guests This Sunday

4 Things to Communicate to First Time Guests This Sunday

Visiting a church for the first time can be a nerve-wracking experience. A few months ago, I put myself in the role of a first time guest. I was out-of-state and decided to check out a nearby church. What did I do first?  I looked up the church online. I found service times, checked out the pastor and got a general feel for the church.

Then I actually visited on Sunday. I walked in and immediately started looking for some place marked for first time guests…but I never found it. As I sat in the auditorium listening to announcements, I waited for a special welcome to guests and instructions for where to turn in my information card…but I never heard it.

Perhaps I totally missed these parts of the service or maybe it was an off day. Who knows. But as church communicators, we can’t afford to miss the chance to communicate with 1st time guests.

First time guests are one of the most important audiences we communicate with and we need to get it right every single Sunday.

Here are four things you should communicate to first time guests this Sunday.

1. We’re glad you’re here.

This probably seems like common sense, right? But sometimes the most basic principles are the most easily forgotten.

A welcome to your guests could be in the form of your Lead Pastor giving a special welcome, in video announcements, a note in the bulletin and, of course, on your website.

There should be a special place reserved just for new guests and custom print materials catered to first time guests.

First Time Guest KioskAt my church, we have a First Time Guest Kiosk. This is where we receive guests and give them information and a gift. We also use this as a starting point where we can lead them into our facility and show them around.

We currently meet at a movie theater so our first time guest materials are packaged in a popcorn box. Inside includes: welcome booklet, CD from our Lead Pastor, candy, and microwave popcorn. We instruct our guests to fill out the Connection Card inside the bulletin and bring it back after the service. When they do this, we make a donation to one of our Strategic Partners and we also give them a $5 Starbucks gift card.

2. Next Steps

Your guests can’t take the next step if they don’t know about it. Turn in a Connection Card. Go the new attendee class. Check out a small group. Whatever your next step is for your guests, make sure they know. You can let your guests know when you welcome them, put it in your bulletin, and make it a part of your follow-up process.

One part of our follow-up process is to send a letter to anyone who turned in a Connection Card and invite them to Discovering Southbridge. This is a place where they can meet our Lead Pastor, ask questions and begin their journey with our church.

3. Where to get more information.

Where should guests go to have their questions answered? Visit our website. Stop by Guest Services (or whatever your church calls it). Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter. Tell them where to go to get the information they are looking for.

4. We hope to see you next week.

Surprisingly, this is the one that seems to be most overlooked. Show them why they should return the next week. Let them know about an upcoming sermon series or event. But it can be even simpler than that. Have your hospitality team make a point of inviting people back next week as they leave.

What do you think? What should you communicate to guests this Sunday?

How to Lead Design When You’re Not a Graphic Designer

I graduated with a degree in mass communication and marketing. But when I stepped into the role of Communications Director, I found myself faced with leading our church in graphic design and artwork.

If you’re in this position too, don’t worry. You can still lead design for your church without being a graphic designer.

Here are five lessons I’ve learned. I hope they are helpful to you!

1. Learn to identify good design and bad design.

Let’s be honest, there’s some really terrible design work out there. And unfortunately a lot of it is produced by churches. Learn to identify what makes the difference between a well-designed graphic and a poorly designed graphic. Take notes from churches that have a well-developed creative and design department. Check out Elevation Church and Mars Hill. Another great place to draw inspiration from is the Church Marketing Lab on Flickr.

Keep in mind: Be inspired by these designs, don’t just imitate them.

2. Take advantage of free resources.

Did you know that there are a ton of free resources available to you? These sites are gold mines and huge time savers. I’ve included a list of sites at the bottom of this post that should help you out.

3. Find an experienced volunteer.

The best resource for me has been volunteers. Find someone in your church who is passionate about your church’s mission and willing to serve by creating graphics and artwork that visually support that mission. These volunteers should have real-world experience and background in design. Ask to see a portfolio of their work. And, make sure to give them clear expectations and deadlines for projects upfront.

4. Learn the basics. 

I found online tutorials and articles to help me navigate the basics of Adobe Creative Suite. While I still don’t tackle major design projects, this gave me enough knowledge to create simple, basic graphics when I don’t have time to organize a volunteer.

5. Keep it simple.

The worst thing you can do is over complicate a design. Trust me, I’ve done it. It may seem boring, but always lean towards simple. Pick one or two fonts and stick with them. Brady Shearer over at Pro Church Tools has some good advice on this. If you have a solid design volunteer, have them create templates for your pre-service slides, web graphics, etc. and stick with those templates.

 

What do you think? How can you lead design for your church without being a designer?

 

Design Resources

CreationSwap
Vintage Church Resources
Seeds – Church on the Move
Lightstock (non-cheesy stock photos, plus one free photo a week)
Unsplash (10 free hi-res photos every 10 days)

 

5 Leaders I’ve Learned From

5 Leaders I’ve Learned From

When I was an intern at my church, I read every book and blog I could find about church communication. I have a degree in mass communication and marketing, but that doesn’t mean that transferred into church communication. Today I want to take time to recognize leaders who shared their resources and knowledge to help people like me who were just getting started.

Here are five leaders I’ve learned from.

1. Tim Peters

Tim writes very practical articles about how to develop a communication strategy and simplify your communication systems. Plus, he recently came out with Sayge Resources if you’re looking for more church communication goodness. Website // Twitter 

 

2. Kem Meyer // Less Clutter Less Noise

Less Clutter Less Noise is an essential read if you want to learn about church communication. It reads like a collection of blog posts and you’ll fly through it. Kem’s kind of like the queen of church communication. Website // Twitter 

 

3. Phil Bowdle

My favorite thing about Phil is that he provides actual tools and shows you how to implement the ideas he shares.  Also, if you send him a question on Twitter, he’s always responsive and ready to share his knowledge with you. Website // Twitter

 

4. Brady Shearer // Pro Church Tools

Pro Church Tools has only been around about a year but Brady shares amazing tips and tricks for churches looking to master the basics of media. If you’re like me and not a designer but often faced with leading design for your church, you need to check it out. Website // Twitter 

 

5. Church Marketing Sucks

Yeah I know, this technically isn’t one leader but it’s my post so I can break the rules. Church Marketing Sucks is the mac daddy of articles for everything from promotions and marketing to design and websites for the church. Website // Twitter

 

So there you have it! Leaders that I have learned from. Now, this isn’t an inclusive list. There’s no way I could list all the leaders I’ve learned from but these are a few who made a big impact on me.

What about you? Which church communication leader have you learned from?

Defining a Win

I define wins by the life change that was experienced, not the amount of people that showed up.  If we draw a massive crowd but no life change happens, how can we say we’ve accomplished the mission?  It’s easier to look at numbers than  life change. As someone who likes systems and formulas, I fall into this trap easily. Looking at the number of people who came to an event, or signed up for a class. But while width matters in ministry, depth matters too. Don’t get me wrong, numbers do matter. But they don’t always mean you are winning. 

Evaluate the numbers but focus on the life change.

How does your team define wins?

3 Ways to Prioritize Your Communication

When I map our communication and promotion schedules, I look at three key areas.

1. Time

In December our focus has been on our Christmas Eve service. Why? Because it’s time sensitive. When prioritizing, begin with the calendar.

2.  Relevance

What level does the communication apply to your audience? The women’s book club meeting probably won’t affect 80% or more of your audience but that outreach event might. Before you promote, ask yourself “To how many people does this information apply?” and work from there.

3. Mission

Does that communication directly reflect and support your church’s overall mission? Focus your communication around the happenings that communicate how to be a part of your church’s mission or celebrate that the mission is active.